misandry-mermaid
drziggystardust:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

Hehe equality right?

Do you not understand the purpose of this, or why the prices are what they are? Does this need to be explained to you?

Oh yea right, the famous “wage gap” between men and women that has been debunked tons of times! That sure is the right argument to fight sexism with!

Not debunked, misrepresented, as it is a complicated issue. It’s honestly more accurate to call it a PAY gap than a WAGE gap, since there are a myriad of factors at play here. Women DO, on average, make less money than men. That is indisputable, and the margins widen when you include factors of race, disability, and sexuality. 
Here’s a good starter resource on it. 
IF you would like some more in depth reading:
This one is from Stanford about the Gender Pay Gap
This is a New York Times article looking at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s report on the topic.
This one is from the International Trade Union Confederation 
This one is from Oxford, titled Up the Down Staircase: Women’s Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization
You can also look at the US Census’s look at the Pay Gap
Or the Institute for Women’s Policy Research
Even the United States Government Accountability Office has some information on it.
So yes, the bake sale above is a pretty simplistic little stunt about a complicated economic and social issue. But the fact that it pisses people off sort of makes its point for it. 

Excellent primary sources for those concerned about sex based oppression/ how men continually benefit from female subjugation also I would really like one of those Vegan cupcakes

drziggystardust:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

Hehe equality right?

Do you not understand the purpose of this, or why the prices are what they are? Does this need to be explained to you?

Oh yea right, the famous “wage gap” between men and women that has been debunked tons of times! That sure is the right argument to fight sexism with!

Not debunked, misrepresented, as it is a complicated issue. It’s honestly more accurate to call it a PAY gap than a WAGE gap, since there are a myriad of factors at play here. Women DO, on average, make less money than men. That is indisputable, and the margins widen when you include factors of race, disability, and sexuality. 

Here’s a good starter resource on it. 

IF you would like some more in depth reading:

This one is from Stanford about the Gender Pay Gap

This is a New York Times article looking at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s report on the topic.

This one is from the International Trade Union Confederation 

This one is from Oxford, titled Up the Down Staircase: Women’s Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization

You can also look at the US Census’s look at the Pay Gap

Or the Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Even the United States Government Accountability Office has some information on it.

So yes, the bake sale above is a pretty simplistic little stunt about a complicated economic and social issue. But the fact that it pisses people off sort of makes its point for it. 

Excellent primary sources for those concerned about sex based oppression/ how men continually benefit from female subjugation also I would really like one of those Vegan cupcakes

paintchipsfromthewall

Sometimes he’ll tell me about his college days, about an Afghanistan I have never known and very few people would believe ever existed.

"In the College of Engineering, there was this lecture hall, with seats for 1,000 students," his says as eyes begin to get bigger. "At the end of the lecture, the seats would move. The whole auditorium would shift as you spun along the diameter. The engineering of the building itself was very interesting." He continues to describe the construction details, then sighs. "I wonder if it’s still around?"

There is a pause. For 25 years I have tried to fill that silence, but I have never quite figured out what to say. I guess silence goes best there. He is the next one to speak. “You see, even your old-aged father was once part of something important.”

When he says things like that I want to scream. I don’t want to believe that the years can beat away at you like that. I don’t want to know that if enough time passes, you begin to question what was real or who you are. I am unconcerned with what the world thinks of him, but it is devastating to know that he at times thinks less of himself.

We are the same, but we are separated. People don’t see him in me. I wish they would. I walk in with a doctor’s white coat or a suit or my Berkeley sweatshirt and jeans. High heels or sneakers, it doesn’t matter, people always seem impressed with me. “Pediatrician, eh?” they say. “Well, good for you.”

I wonder what people see when they look at him. They don’t see what I see in his smile. Perhaps they see a brown man with a thick accent; perhaps they think, another immigrant cabdriver. Or perhaps it is much worse: Maybe he is a profile-matched terrorist, aligned with some axis of evil. “Another Abd-ool f——-g foreigner,” I once heard someone say.

Sometimes the worst things are not what people say to your face or what they say at all, it is the things that are assumed. I am in line at the grocery store, studying at a cafe, on a plane flying somewhere.

"Her English is excellent; she must have grown up here," I hear a lady whisper. "But why on earth does she wear that thing on her head?"

"Oh, that’s not her fault," someone replies. "Her father probably forces her to wear that."

I am still searching for a quick, biting response to comments like that. The trouble is that things I’d like to say aren’t quick. So I say nothing. I want to take their hands and pull them home with me. Come, meet my father. Don’t look at the wrinkles; don’t look at the scars; don’t mind the hearing aid, or the thick accent. Don’t look at the world’s effect on him; look at his effect on the world. Come into my childhood and hear the lullabies, the warm hand on your shoulder on the worst of days, the silly jokes on mundane afternoons. Come meet the woman he has loved and respected his whole life; witness the confidence he has nurtured in his three daughters. Stay the night; hear his footsteps come in at midnight after a long day’s work. That sound in the middle of the night is his head bowing in prayer although he is exhausted. Granted, the wealth is gone and the legacy unknown, but look at what the bombs did not destroy. Now tell me, am I really oppressed? The question makes me want to laugh. Now tell me, is he really the oppressor? The question makes me want to cry.

At times, I want to throw it all away: the education, the opportunities, the potential. I want to slip into the passenger seat of his cab and say: This is who I am. If he is going to be labeled, then give me those labels too. If you are going to look down on him, than you might as well peer down on me as well. Close this gap. Erase this line. There is no differentiation here. Of all the things I am, of all the things I could ever be, I will never be prouder than to say that I am of him.

I am this cabdriver’s daughter.

A pediatrician takes pride in her Afghan cabdriver father

It’s been four years and this piece still moves me to tears every time. 

(via musaafer)

paintchipsfromthewall

paintchipsfromthewall:

chipotleaf:

countingcrowds:

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

Her paintings are so breathtaking! <3 <3 

But does anyone else see that cat face in the last painting?!

This is incredible. WOW